Easy Chicken Drumsticks with Sweet Potato

I’ve posted a similar recipe HERE, before, using chicken thighs. I tend to buy drumsticks because, well, 1) they’re less expensive and 2) they include the skin and the bone, both of which are critical for optimal Vitamin D and glycine consumption. Glycine is an amino acid that we derive from skin, bones and cartilage of animals. You can also get glycine from legumes, but if you’re eating a Paleo diet, legumes are not part of your regimen.

This recipe is quick, has few ingredients and uses one pan and has very little prep time or steps. Because of this, it happens to be a meal that I make fairly often in the fall when sweet potatoes seem to be delicious with anything.

Ingredients
2-3 lbs chicken drumsticks (pastured)
2 medium sweet potatoes
A few leaves of fresh sage (adding fresh rosemary is also delicious)
2-3 Tbsp butter (I tend to use Kerrygold from the store or a butter from a local farm that is unpasturized)
1 tsp ground mustard
Sea salt and black pepper to taste

Instructions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
Slice the sweet potatoes into thin slices. (Keep in mind that the thinner the slice, the fast they will cook.)
Line the sweet potatoes in a baking dish and top with fresh herbs, as pictured below

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Top the sweet potato slices with the drumsticks, as pictured below

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Sprinkle the ground mustard, black pepper and salt over the chicken
Bake at 400 for 35 minutes
Allow the chicken to cool for a few minutes before serving

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Enjoy!

(No Bake) Protein Cookies

I’m originally from Maine, and stand behind good, local products. Stronger Faster Healthier has a great whey protein product that is designed, formulated and produced in Warren, Maine.  They are GMO free and derive their whey from free range and grass fed cows. On their website, SFH states: “Our mission has been consistent: The combination of a clean diet, exercise, along with clean supplementation (high-strength fish oil and high-quality protein) leads to long term health by keeping your inflammation levels down and adding lean muscle.”

Sometimes I want a quick snack, or something I can grab and go and eat later in the car while on the road. Most snacks and grab-and-go foods are loaded with refined sugars, processed oils and extra (unpronounceable) ingredients that I don’t necessarily want to consume. Naturally, I made something that is quick, healthy and contains a good amount of protein for sustained energy throughout my mornings. It requires zero cook time, little clean up and a quick use of a food processor. Plus, you can make these in bulk and freeze them easily!

Ingredients
10 pitted Medjool dates
2 scoops of Chocolate whey protein (I used SFH- Stronger Faster Healthier Grass-fed Whey)
1/4 cup shredded, unsweetened coconut flakes
1/2 cup almonds (you can sub for a different nut if want to!)
2 tsp vanilla extract

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Instructions
If your dates are not pitted, remove the seed before proceeding
Blend all ingredients in a food processor until you reach your desired consistency
(as pictured, I prefer some larger pieces of nuts and dates in my cookies)
If your mixture is quite dry, you can add a tsp of water and continue to blend

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Roll bite-size balls of the dough in your hands and flatten into cookies

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For best results, place cookies in the refrigerator for approximately 1 hour before consuming

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I keep mine in a glass pyrex dish in the fridge!

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Enjoy!

You can also purchase SFH Whey Protein HERE on Amazon (Affiliate link)

 

Mexican Stuffed Peppers with Mango Salsa

I’ve always liked stuffed peppers; my mom used to make them with a tomato sauce, white rice and ground beef stuffed into a green bell pepper and covered with cheese. I have always liked tacos, too. This recipe was my (successful) attempt to mix the best of both- a mexican-style stuffed pepper. Pair the stuffed pepper (with slightly spicy ground beef) with a side of sweet mango salsa and it is absolutely delicious! (Of course, I am biased…)

Ingredients for Stuffed Peppers:
1 lb grass-fed ground beef
1/2 red onion, chopped
1 small bunch chopped fresh cilantro
1-2 tsp chili powder (depending on spice preference) 
1/2 tsp cumin
2 fresh garlic cloves, chopped
3 peppers (for stuffing)
1 cup tomato salsa for topping

Ground beef cilantro onion

Steps:
In a skillet or frying pan, add butter, onion, garlic, spices, cilantro and ground beef
(set peppers and salsa aside for now)
Cook over medium heat, stirring and breaking up the beef as it cooks

While beef is cooking, prepare your Mango Salsa

Ingredients for Mango Salsa:
1 cup chopped mango (can use frozen and thaw out, or cut fresh mango)
Small bunch fresh chopped cilantro
Small bunch fresh chopped dill
1/4 chopped red onion
(I also like to add tomatoes)

Mango Salsa Ingredients

Steps: 
Mix all ingredients together

Mango Salsa from Keirstens Kitchen

Now for the rest of the stuffed peppers…

Once the beef is done, set aside
Preheat oven to 375 F
Cut peppers in half and de-seed, as pictured below

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Stuff the peppers with the cooked beef mixture
Top with salsa
Bake at 375 for approximately 15 minutes, or until peppers are desired texture (I like mine still a bit firm)

Keirstens Kitchen Stuffed Peppers

Remove from oven and allow a few minutes to cool before serving

SAMSUNG

Enjoy!

Keirstens Kitchen Stuffed Peppers with Mango Salsa and Avocado

Suggested purchase: Glass Pyrex baking dishes! You can get a set of 3, HERE on Amazon for $20.00 (at time of post) and they even have lids. You can bake in these, then cover and refrigerate. Easy to hold leftovers and oven and dishwasher safe! 

Gluten-Free Fried Chicken

I have 2 nieces (ages 6 and 3) and a nephew (age 10.) Whenever they come over for dinner, they ask for pizza or pasta, sometimes “salad tacos” (tacos on Romaine lettuce leaves in lieu of corn taco shells, recipe HERE.)

On pizza nights, I usually make this Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Crust. On “pasta” nights, I throw together some spaghetti squash (recipe for Spaghetti Squash and Meat Sauce HERE) along with a good protein and vegetable on the side. I didn’t use cheese for this recipe, but I imagine it would be delicious; a gluten-free fried chicken recipe turned chicken parmesan!

Ingredients:
3-4 chicken thighs (can use bone-in thighs, drumsticks or breasts, too. Just adjust cooking times accordingly.) 
2 cups almond meal
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp Italian seasonings (usually contains parsley, basil, oregano, thyme, etc.)
few pinches of dried rosemary
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
Oil for frying (coconut oil recommended. I use THIS ONE.)

Steps:
Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat until melted
While oil is melting, mix almond meal, garlic powder, onion powder, Italian seasonings, salt, pepper and dried rosemary together in a medium bowl

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Coat chicken in the mixture
(I hardly ever use an egg wash due to cooking for people with egg allergies, but feel free!) 
Place coated chicken in skillet (may splatter a bit, so be careful)  

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Cook over medium heat for approximately 10-12 minutes without flipping

Flip chicken and continue to cook for another 10-12 minutes (longer if using breasts or thicker cuts of chicken) 

 

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Serve fried chicken with pasta and sauce for a chicken parmesan-type meal, over a salad, with a side of vegetables and gluten-free carb source or simply enjoy with some Ranch dip (recipe HERE!)

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Enjoy!

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Gluten-Free Football!

Hosting some friends for the game?  Have that weird friend who asks what’s in everything? The one that always asks for the gluten-free food at your house or asks for the gluten-free menu at a restaurant? The Paleo friend? The low carb friend?

Well, here is a list of gluten-free, lower carb (and Paleo/Paleo-ish) football snack ideas. And the best thing? These are all “normal” foods that are sure to please all of your Sunday guests. Each recipe will link to its home website, so visit these pages and give them some love on social media for sharing such awesome recipes!

Buffalo Drumsticks 
from Keirsten’s Kitchen

buffalo drumsticks keirstens kitchen

Meatballs with Spiced Tomato Sauce
from Tummyrumblr 
tummyrumblr  

Bacon-Wrapped Dates 
from Keirsten’s Kitchen
Bacon Wrapped Dates

Jalapeño Poppers
from Keirsten’s Kitchen
jp


Jalapeño-Lime Chicken Wings

from Stupid Easy Paleo and Meatified
lime jalepeno chicken wings from stupid easy paleo


Bacon-Wrapped Butternut Squash Bites

from Holistically Engineered
Bacon and butternut squash bites from holistically engineered


Orange Sesame Wings

from Keirsten’s Kitchen
Keirstens kitchen orange sesame wings


Spinach, Bacon and Artichoke Dip

from Virginia is for Hunter-Gatherers
Spinach Bacon and Artichoke Dip from vahuntergatherers.com


Taco Dip

from Keirsten’s Kitchen
keirstens kitchen taco dip


Endive Salmon Poppers

from Paleo Plan
paleo-recipes_salmon-endive-poppers


Hummus

from Amazing Paleo
Paleo-Hummmus-amazing paleo


Chicken Dippers with Buffalo Ranch Dipping Sauce

from Primally Inspired
chicken dippers from Primally Inspired


Bacon Guacamole Deviled Eggs

from Peace Love and Low Carb
bacon guac deviled eggs from peace love and low carb


Bacon-Wrapped Mozzarella Sticks

from Eat Fat Lose Fat
bacon-wrapped-mozzarella-sticks from eat fat lose fat blog


Popcorn Shrimp 

from Ancestral Chef (as seen in Paleo Magazine)
popcorn shrimp from ancestral chef as seen in paleo magazine

There you have it! 15 delicious recipes from various Paleo and Gluten-Free bloggers.

Enjoy!

Wild Mushrooms! Foraging and Preparing Dinner in Western Maine

A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure of visiting friends in Western Maine. The weather was beautiful- warm, a bit humid with a bit of a breeze, but comfortable to sleep outside in the open air. We walked through the woods in search of wild fungi to add to our dinner and came across an abundance of chanterelles and black trumpet mushrooms. Chanterelles were much easier to spot on the forest floor, given their orange color amidst the green and brown ground covering. The black trumpets, however, seemed to sneak up on us as their colors blended with the dark soil and brush. Here is a quick reference to help identify both chanterelles and black trumpets.

Identifying chanterelles

Caps: The cap of the chanterelle can be somewhat funnel-shaped with rigid edges.  The color ranges from a dark yellow to yellow/brown to orange and orange/brown.
Gills: The gills are actually ridges, and run from the stem to the edge of the underside of the cap. Toward the edge of the cap, the ridges actually fork. The ridges run down the stem.

chanterelle

Chanterelle (Cantharellus Cibarius)

Picture courtesy of David Spahr

The stem is just about the same color as the cap and gills. The flesh is yellowish-white to orange in color.

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Chanterelle

Chanterelles grow on the forest floor, often in mossy areas beneath trees. Chanterelles do not grow in clumps, but rather  (as some other mushrooms do and are often mistaken for chanterelles.)

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Chanterelles found in Western Maine

Chanterelles are known for having a faint scent of apricots. While I have not experienced this with a single chanterelle, I do pick up on some fruity, apricot-like scents when I have been able to collect a small handful.

Identifying Black Trumpets:

Black Trumpets are typically from 2-7 cm wide and up to 10cm in tall. The are tubular with a deep vase shape at the top (see pictures, below.) The caps of this fugue may roll under. They should be black or dark gray in color, and turn more ashen gray as they age. At this stage, they may still be edible but they will not be nearly as delicious! Black trumpets often grow in mossy areas and grow from a single stem, as seen below.

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Black Trumpets in Western Maine

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Black Trumpets foraged (a few chanterelles thrown in, too!)

 

Wild mushrooms should be cooked prior to consumption. Preparing these wild mushrooms was quite simple; we removed the dirt from the stems and caps (by hand or with a small knife) and sautéed in some butter over a fire outdoors until they were softened, which was about 10 minutes. The butter in this picture (below) is from a local farm– it’s raw and from grass-fed cows. You can add a bit of salt while cooking or wait until your mushrooms are plated and ready to be consumed. (You can cook wild mushrooms the same way you cook domesticated/grocery store mushrooms.) 

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Preparing to cook the mushrooms over a fire. Check out the color of that butter!

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Chanterelles and Black Trumpets being sautéed in butter

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Chanterelles and Black Trumpets

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Cooked chanterelles

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Cooked Black Trumpets

 

Consuming wild foods is still, unfortunately, a taboo subject for some; mushrooms seem to be the most daunting. Arthur Haines, owner of the Delta Institute of Natural History, plant taxonomist, botanist and anthropological nutritionist writes:

Our society has a fear of fungi, there is no doubting that. We’ve been told they can kill us if we ingest the wrong species (which is true). So, we avoid culinary interaction with all wild species because some are poisonous. How is this different from plants, or wild animals, or people (aren’t some of those dangerous as well)? How is this different from farmed foods (people die every year from eating cultivated produce). Recognize that over 300,000 people are hospitalized each year in the US eating “safe food”. Knowing this, are you going to avoid store-purchased food?” 

Arthur continues to write:

“Fungi contain a special group of carbohydrates, complex polysaccharides called glucans, which are known to beneficially activate the immune system. Glucans are known to stimulate Natural Killer Cells to destroy malignant cells, increase the scavenging activity of macrophages, induce maturation of T-Cells to enhance cellular immunity, stimulate B-Cells to produce antibodies to tumor antigens, increase release of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha to induce programmed cell death, up-regulate production of Interferon alpha from white blood cells to improve viral resistance in the body, increase the concentration of some Interleukins that are responsible for triggering the maturation of other immune cells and, well, you get the point.  Mushrooms improve the functioning of our immune system in a manner that protects us from bacteria, viruses, and cancer.”

 

You can read the rest of his post on Mycophobia: Is it doing us any good? HERE

You can find Arthur at www.arthurhaines.com, on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.

 

Other mushroom identification resources: (not affiliate links)

mushroom identification book   mushroom 2  mush 3  mush 4

 

And to leave you with a quite from Arthur’s website:

“Don’t fear the wild– embrace it!”

 

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